Happy Sunday! Hope everyone is relaxing and making the most of the day before Dread Monday comes around. I woke up this morning thinking about biscuits—if I really, really had to choose, biscuits may be in my top five things I would choose to eat for the rest of my life… and if that were the case, I most likely wouldn’t live to see past age 35.

If you know me, you know that I’ve been perfecting my biscuit recipe for YEARS. I am really particular about my biscuit: They have to be fluffy, yet have a slight crunch on the outside, and really freaking salty and buttery. Also they must always pull apart effortlessly. If you’re a biscuit that’s hard to pull apart by any means… thank you, next. Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about biscuit-making, and I believe I have come close to perfection. Disclaimer: If you’re a health-conscious freak, I suggest you walk the other way, because there is a lot of fat here.

The reality is that making biscuits is pretty dang easy once you get the right mix of ingredients. And the one thing to remember here is that everything needs to be REALLY COLD. You can use buttermilk in this recipe, but I never have buttermilk on hand. Who does?! I like to use half and half with white vinegar. Daniel is still sleeping, and he’s going to be SO excited when he wakes up, because he’ll get one of my famous biscuit sandwiches. (Update: He was clapping!)

 


Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 35 minutes Servings: 9 biscuits


What You’ll Need

  • 2 cups King Arthur all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 stick unsalted butter, frozen and cut into small cubes
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk or half and half with 1 tbsp. white vinegar (I recommend putting it in the fridge for at least 15 minutes to let the mixture get sour.)
  • 1 heap tbsp. bacon fat
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • extra melted butter + salt for finish

How You’ll Do It

  1. In a large bowl, combine all-purpose flour, baking powder and salt, and then add the cubed butter.
  2. For mixing in the butter, I like to use a pastry cutter so that the warmth of my hand doesn’t melt the butter. If you don’t have a pastry cutter, you can use your hands—just be fast with it!
  3. Once the flour mixture looks crumbly, pour in the buttermilk or half and half, and bacon fat, and mix until everything is evenly combined. Rule of thumb: Don’t over-mix!

     

  4. Let the dough rest in the fridge for at least 15 minutes but no more than 30 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 350º F, and then take out a cast iron skillet or casserole dish. Either works, but I prefer the cast iron for the crispy bottom!
  6. Grease the cast iron or casserole dish with butter or extra bacon fat if you have it. Then take an ice cream scoop, and scoop big balls of the dough onto the pan. You want to spread them out about 1/2 inch apart, as they rise when they bake.
  7. Use a brush to evenly dab the beaten egg on each biscuit. Make sure you use a dabbing motion versus stroking motion—the biscuit babies are delicate! Once you finish dabbing each biscuit, repeat! You want a thick layer, because the egg tends to run off the biscuit during the process.
  8. Bake the biscuits in the oven for about 25 to 35 minutes, depending on how strong your oven is. Check every 5 minutes when you past the 20-minute mark.
  9. Once the biscuits are golden brown, take them out. Take some butter and put a small cube on each biscuit. It’ll melt quickly, and then you’ll generously add salt (it’s the best part).
  10. Let the biscuit cool for at least 10 minutes, then you can make sandwiches, eat them with gravy or on its own!
Biscuit Breakfast Sandwich
Biscuit breakfast sandwich—crisp bacon, runny egg, cheddar cheese and dijon—accompanied by one of my extra vinegary pickles.
Posted by:nhubbies

I really like eating and talking about food.

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